WHO'S WHO IN JUST A MINUTE!
Some info and comments on the cast of Just A Minute..... Click here to return to the main cast page

Paul Merton

JAM Appearances:
385 including 371 as a panellist on Radio in 1989-1990-1991-1992-1993-1994-1995-1996-1997-1998-1999-2000-2001-2002-2003-2004-2005-2006-2007-2008-2009-2010-2011-2012-2013-2014-2015-2016, 10 as a panellist on TV in 2012, two on Junior Just A Minute in 2015, and one each on the Silver Minutes special and the 40th anniversary special.
How he did:
Paul Merton is certainly the star of the show today. Although Nicholas often claims that the order he introduces the panel in doesn't matter, he always announces Paul first. Paul almost always wins a show in which he appears and always dominates it. If not speaking, he is challenging or interjecting, and his humour gets the biggest laughs.
It is also arguable at least that Paul is the reason the show is still on the air. At the time of Kenneth Williams' death in 1988, the show was beginning to sound old. Both the remaining regulars and the guests were from an aging group, in their 50s and 60s, and there was no hint that the show was able to rejuvenate itself as its cast and its listeners got older.
Paul says he had a special affection for the show even before he appeared on it, recording shows for replay when he was in a bedsit and could not afford much in the way of entertainment. It was against that background that Paul wrote to the show's then producer Edward Taylor asking if he could appear on the show. Taylor booked Paul for only one of two shows at a recording, and warned him to dress properly and not swear. But Paul opened the door for younger comedians to appear on the show. A trickle at first: Jimmy Mulville in 1990, Sandi Toksvig in 1991, Stephen Fry in 1992, but now with Peter Jones and Derek Nimmo also dead, the show is dominated by comedians of Paul's age or younger. Would people like Graham Norton, Linda Smith, Tony Hawks and Ross Noble been attracted to the programme if a young star like Paul had not joined the show?
Paul's style has also been hugely influential. Paul doesn't tell anecdotes about his life or quote old music hall routines like the regulars of the 70s and 80s. He instead takes listeners on a surrealistic journey, playing with words, often words uttered by the others in a genuine improvisational riff. He's told of his space trip to Mars, his marriage to a male burglar and his time as Nicholas's sex slave. If challenged on deviation, he'll usually turn up the heat. When he couldn't persuade Nicholas that Clement had deviated by claiming to be outwitted by a herbaceous border, he turned theose words into a surreal comic masterpiece. He is a playful player, mixing in insults to the others, but particularly Nicholas Parsons. He has taken over the role of Kenneth and Derek in attacking Nicholas's chairmanship, sending him up mercilessly. He is highly intelligent and can converse on any subject given to him, despite his constant claims to have only done metalwork at school.
As both a supremely competent player of the game - he wins about two in three of the games he plays - and also supremely funny, Paul has a claim to be the best player of the game ever. That can only be a subjective judgement of course. What does seem clear is that with the prestige he has as one of Britain's most popular comedians, the future of the show is in his hands. Paul loved the show for years before he joined it, and clearly still loves doing it. If he wants to continue past the retirements of Nicholas and Clement, the BBC would be mad not to let him. He's the jewel of the JAM throne, the key man and someone who will have a great deal to say in JAM's future.

Who is he:
Paul is one of, and arguably THE, biggest name in British comedy today. He is best known for his role as a team captain in Have I Got News For You, a satirical TV news based game show where he has been a regular since 1990. Paul's role in the show is somewhat odd, as he doesn't really do political jokes as such, leaving those mostly to the other team captain Ian Hislop. What Paul does is something similar to what he does on JAM, that is indulge in surrealist fantasy and launch into improvisational riffs based on the words of others. Although nominally just a team captain - his name appears only third in the credits - he is undoubtedly the star of the show and this year won a BAFTA award this year for his work there.
Paul first came to public attention as a stand-up comic and an improviser with the Comedy Store Players. His first regular TV work was on Whose Line Is It Anyway in its earlier seasons. At the time he was co-writing the very popular comedy game show Sticky Moments which featured his friend Julian Clary. These days Paul is very well paid for his Have I Got News For You appearances and this allows him to do pretty much what he likes in the rest of his time. He still appears weekly with the Comedy Store Players, and gets involved in other projects. He remade the famous Hancock shows with him in the title role, and made a film The Suicidal Dog. A recent move into writing and talking about the history of silent movies has exposed him as an expert on that subject. He has also made two series of TV travel programmes and a tribute to Morecambe and Wise. He hosted another TV game show, Room 101 for several years. He has been involved in other radio shows. But in general his other projects have not been as successful as HIGNFY and JAM which look likely to remain his most popular public work. Was part of the cult radio series The Masterton Inheritance. Was judged one of the 50 funniest people in Britain in 2003.

Links to transcripts:
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 100 101 102 103 104 105 106 107 108 109 110 111 112 113 114 115 116 117 118 119 120 121 122 123 124 125 126 127 128 129 130 131 132 133 134 135 136 137 138 139 140 141 142 143 144 145 146 147 148 149 150 151 152 153 154 155 156 157 158 159 160 161 162 163 164 165 166 167 168 169 170 171 172 173 174 175 176 177 178 179 180 181 182 183 184 185 186 187 188 189 190 191 192 193 194 195 196 197 198 199 200 201 202 203 204 205 206 207 208 209 210 211 212 213 214 215 216 217 218 219 220 221 222 223 224 225 226 227 228 229 230 231 232 233 234 235 236 237 238 239 240 241 242 243 244 245 246 247 248 249 250 251 252 253 254 255 256 257 258 259 260 261 262 263 264 265 266 267 268 269 270 271 272 273 274 275 276 277 278 279 280 281 282 283 284 285 286 287 288 289 290 291 292 293 294 295 296 297 298 299

Ian Messiter

JAM Appearances:
Four including one as chairman on radio in 1977, one as a panellist on radio in 1982, one as a guest speaker in one round in 1977, and one on the Silver Minutes compilation special.
How he did:
Ian is the creator of the show, and so no-one has more importance in the show's history than Ian. Ian says the basic idea of the show came from an incident at school when a teacher caught him in a dreamworld and asked him to recite what he had been talking about, without repetition, deviation and hesitation. He first developed the idea properly in 1951 as an idea for a game show at the BBC. As originally developed, the show had three men playing three women with a jury ruling on their efforts. Ian suggested the name Just A Minute, but the BBC felt it sounded too harsh and the name became One Minute Please.
The show had a successful run for a couple of years with some of the regulars such as Gerard Hoffnung and Philip Harben becoming household names as a result of their exposure on One Minute Please. But the show finished when Ian left the BBC and Hoffnung died.
The show was rejuvenated under its orginal name in 1967 when Ian took the idea to the BBC. Ian had been producer of One Minute Please, but as he did not return to the staff of the BBC, he did not have total control of the show with the producer being the very talented David Hatch. But Ian was always a key part of the show, quite apart from appearing at each recording to blow the whistle. He was involved with all aspects of the show - refining the rules, sometimes choosing the performers and it was his personal responsibility to set the subjects.
As whistle blower Ian was a real presence in the show, his hearty chuckles being easily heard. Nicholas would often turn to him for rulings on difficult subjects and he had the sort of stage whisper that everyone hears. Ian twice gave up the whistle to perform, on both occasions it was because scheduled performers had not turned up. In 1977 he took the chair and proved very adept. An appearance as a panellist in 1982 was less successful. But on both occasions he displayed the warm humour which one might expect from someone whose mind invented this game.
In 1990, Ian gave up the whistle, but continued to be involved in the show, preparing the subjects. He was involved intimately in its TV incarnations, even picking some of the mystery objects for those shows. He was still involved with the show when he passed away in 1999.

Who is he:
As the creator of Just A Minute Ian continues to be mentioned on every programme. Ian wrote his own book, My Life And Other Games, and it's well worth a read if you can get a copy. Ian performed from an early age, as a magician. He joined the BBC as a producer in the late 40s and became involved with a number of game shows, many of which he invented himself. He left the BBC in 1952 to join the South African Broadcasting Corporation but eventually left after he found the racism of apartheid distasteful. Returning to Britain, he resumed work on game shows without again becoming a staff producer. As well as Just A Minute, other shows which he heavily involved with include Many A Slip, Twenty Questions and Petticoat Junction. He also developed a successful home game. It may be unfair to suspect that JAM had a special place in his heart, but he never gave up his involvement in it until his untimely passing.
Links to transcripts:
1 2 3
Links to transcripts as chairman:
1

Malcolm Messiter

JAM Appearances:
One as a guest subject setter on Radio at the 35th anniversary special in 2003.
How he did:
Representing his father, the creator of the game, Malcolm managed the task with dignity and humour.
Who is he:
Malcolm is as creative as his father, but in a different area. He is an oboist of international renown, both as a soloist and in some of the best orchestras in the United Kingdom. He also runs a software company.
Links to transcripts:
1

David Mitchell

JAM Appearances:
Four as a panellist on Radio in 2009-2010.
How he did:
Competitive, funny and just right - David fitted into the style of the show immediately. he will surely be a regular in the future, if he enjoyed it as much as we did.
Who is he:
David is an actor, comedian and writer. He is best known as part of the double act Mitchell and Webb, alongside Robert Webb, with whom he appears in the TV series Peep Show. Other shows in which they have appeared include The Mitchell and Webb Situation, That Mitchell and Webb Sound and That Mitchell and Webb Look. David also appears frequently on panel shows, including QI, Mock the Week, Have I Got News For You, Best of the Worst, Would I Lie To You? and The Unbelievable Truth which he hosts.
Links to transcripts:
1 2 3 4

Warren Mitchell

JAM Appearances:
Two as a panellist on Radio in 1973.
How he did:
Warren was one of the better guests who only received the call-up once. He had some good stories, made some good jokes, enjoyed the banter and seemed to thoroughly enjoy himself.
Who is he:
Warren Mitchell's name will always be associated with Alf Garnett and the sitcom series of Till Death Us Do Part. Ground breaking in its time Mitchell played a working class bigot who spent most of each half-hour sitting in his hovel lecturing his family on the wonders of the Tories and the Royal Family, and the horrors of Labour and the "darkies". Mitchell became so associated with the character that he took it on tour in a stand-up act, but he is now highly respected as a stage actor and continues to appear on London's West End in dranatic roles.
Links to transcripts:
1 2

Bob Monkhouse

JAM Appearances:
Two including one as a panellist on Radio in 1980, and one on the 40th anniversary show where a clip of him was played.
How he did:
Bob had great jokes, especially one-liners and generally fitted in like he had been playing for years. He seemed to enjoy it and it's certainly a mystery why he was never asked back. Bob had the sort of style that could easily have seen him become a regular.
Who is he:
One of Britain's best loved comedians and TV presenters, Bob had a long career. He's best known for a succession of game shows which included Celebrity Squares, The Golden Shot, Family Fortune and Opportunity Knocks. He also presented a TV series about classic films called Mad Movies. In all of them his delight in puns and old jokes made him a family favourite.
Links to transcripts:
1 2

Patrick Moore

JAM Appearances:
11 as a panellist on Radio in 1975-1976-1977-1978-1979-1980.
How he did:
Patrick appeared regularly as a guest in the late 70s and even appeared in the pilot for a TV version of JAM with Kenneth, Clement and Peter. This was proof of his success at the game as an eccentric who was able to talk quickly and be competitive in the sport side of the game. Patrick was often given subjects related to astronomy, but even on general subjects he seemed to have plenty to say and his fast talking style made him an effective contrast with the others.
Who is he:
Patrick, recently knighted, is one of Britain's best known faces, with his "mad professor" look, his fast talk and his love of his specialist subject, astronomy. He has fronted his monthly TV show on astronomy The Sky At Night since 1957, and has made The Guiness Book Of Records as the longest lasting TV presenter. In the 70s he was also a regular on game shows and he is also a successful musician as a composer and playing his xylophone. His eccentricity and humour makes him popular everywhere and he continues as actively as ever with best selling books on astronomy, though strangely perhaps he has no qualification in the subject on which he has built his fame.
Links to transcripts:
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Justin Moorhouse

JAM Appearances:
Four as a panellist on Radio in 2009-2010.
How he did:
Cheerful, humorous and Northern, Justin did well in the game, scoring lots of points and was funny enough to deserve at least one more go.
Who is he:
Justin is a stand-up comedian and broadcaster. He has a regular gig on the Manchester radio station Key 103, and he also appeared regularly in the TV series Phoenix Nights.
Links to transcripts:
1 2 3 4

Richard Morton

JAM Appearances:
Six including four as a panellist on TV in 1999, and two on radio in 1993-1999.
How he did:
Richard was able to adapt his stand-up routines to JAM well, having plenty of jokes to tell as part of his participation in the game. Words rushed out of his mouth as if they had a mind of their own. Although he had some success in the game, with the help of Nicholas, he probably wasn't funny or interesting enough to get more than the occasional call-up.
Who is he:
Richard is a stand-up comic who appears frequently on comedy shows on Britain's Channel Five. He has worked with Phill Jupitus, Jack Dee and Caroline Quentin among others.
Links to transcripts:
1 2 3 4 5 6

Neil Mullarkey

JAM Appearances:
Six including four as a panellist on Radio in 1997-2007, and two on TV in 1994.
How he did:
Neil enjoyed the chance to speak at length but didn't really do enough to require his making more than occasional appearances. He was funny enough if slightly shy, strange as it may seem, and was good at teasing the others with challenges.
Who is he:
Neil is a stalwart of the Comedy Store players where he has worked for almost quarter of a century with Paul Merton, Josie Lawrence and Richard Vranch. He's been involved in other comedy projects including game shows but impro and teaching it creates most of his work. He has recently been touring an act in which he plays a motivational guru.
Links to transcripts:
1 2 3 4 5 6

Jimmy Mulville

JAM Appearances:
Three including two as a panellist on Radio in 1990-1991, and one on the Radio 25th anniversary special Silver Minutes in 1992.
How he did:
Jimmy's two appearances were far from classics with him being a tad overshadowed by his big name rivals and not really making much of an impact.
Who is he:
Jimmy was a successful comedian in the late 80s and early 90s, making TV appearances on late night TV, and having some success on the stand-up circuit. He now works as one of the bosses of Hat Trick Productions, the production house which produces such hits as The Kumars at Number 42, Whose Line Is It Anyway and Have I Got News For You. Recently made a mint on selling his share in hat Trick. Recently voted one of the 50 funniest people in Britain.
Links to transcripts:
1 2 3

Richard Murdoch

JAM Appearances:
Eight including seven as a panellist on Radio in 1988-1989-1990 and one on the Silver Minutes special in 1992.
How he did:
Richard quickly became a regular and valued member of the cast and it seems sad somehow that he wasn't "discovered" by the JAM producers until he was in his 78th year. His style was similar to the last days of Peter Jones - a doddery slightly bewildered but basically fun elderly uncle. His style fitted in well with the others and he had a good cache of anecdotes and stories, with the propensity to sing and challenge trivial matters making him a lot of fun on the show. Should surely have been playing JAM for years but died a few months after his last appearance.
Who is he:
Richard was a much loved name in comedy and drama in Britain for over 30 years. A pioneer of radio comedy, he was part of the hugely comedy show Much Binding In The Marsh, and appeared as straight man to the popular comedian Arthur Askey. A regular on Many A Slip, he also did plenty of stage work and appeared in the early seasons of Rumpole Of The Bailey as a doddery old lawyer. His passing was seriously mourned by the public.
Links to transcripts:
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8

Al Murray

JAM Appearances:
Two as a panellist on radio in 2017.
How he did:
Very well, he was a bit overshadowed but was good when he got the chance.
Who is he:
Al is an English comedian and TV personality well known for his stand-up persona and quick repartee. His best-known character is "The Pub Landlord", a xenophobic publican.
Links to transcripts:
His show not yet transcribed.

Chris Neill

JAM Appearances:
26 including 24 as a panellist on Radio in 2002-2003-2005-2006-2007-2008-2009-2010, one as a subject setter on the 35th anniversary special in 2003, and one on the 40th anniversary special in 2007.
How he did:
Chris was JAM's producer from 1998 to 2000 and returned as a panellist a couple of years later. His style is high camp, full of double entendre and slightly dirty stories. With several camp rivals appearing on the show, Chris might be seen as a pale imitation of bigger names like Graham Norton and Julian Clary, but Chris's style is fresh and funny enough to allow him a semi-regular slot on the show in his own right. He also sounds a bit like Kenneth Williams, whose style he has been compared with. He is honest when he breaches a rule, a trait not common on JAM.
Who is he:
Chris was JAM's producer but left to follow his own comedy career. JAM is probably his biggest gig so far but he also does the circuit as a stand-up including the Edinburgh Festival. He appeared regularly on a gay TV show and is working on radio projects.
Links to transcripts:
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26

Derek Nimmo

JAM Appearances:
311 including 307 as a panellist on Radio in 1967-1968-1969-1970-1971-1972-1973-1974-1975-1976-1977-1978-1979-1980-1981-1982-1983-1984-1985-1986-1987-19888-1989-1990-1991-1992-1993-1994-1995-1996-1997-1998-1999, two as a panellist on Television in 1994, one on the 1992 Radio Silver Minutes special, and one in the 40th anniversary special in 2007.
How he did:
Of the four regulars Derek's style is possibly the most difficult to describe. He was a bit of Paul Merton, a bit of Clement, a bit of Kenneth, a bit of Peter Jones and a bit of a high-class travelogue.
Derek was on the very first show and apart from one year off when he was overseas at the time shows were being recorded, he remained a regular until his death in 1999. His is still one of those voices most closely associated with JAM and his passing was mourned.
I will try to describe Derek's style. Possibly most people remember him for his love of travel. Usually at least once during a show he would start to talk about his travels in a very entertaining way, not just in terms of sights seen but as the basis for some anecdote. He certainly loved travelling and his trips to Singapore, Hong Kong, Australia and New Zealand seem to have been particular favourites.
He was always a very competitive player, and usually during his time it was he or Clement that ended up winning. He didn't resort to the tricks of getting in on the last second or listing that Clement would do, but he was good at detecting the breaches of the rules committed by others, and just as good at not breaching those rules himself.
Stll he is hard to classify, because he was capable of such a variety of styles: surrealistic fantasy, or music hall routine, an angry full throated denunciation or a quiet moment of introspection. He was also capable of the vocal gymnastics of a Kenneth Williams, but always delivered in that delicious fruity English voice of the upper class.
In each show Derek would always write down every subject ,even those that were not his, on the pad that was usually provided for each panellist. Occassionally ,when inspiration had temporarily deserted him, he would link all the earlier subjects together into one or more lengthy sentences. This always guaranteed a chuckle from the audience.
Derek was also arguably the harshest critic of Nicholas Parsons, but it was always done with a smile in his voice, and only very rarely did he actually seem irritated by any Nicholas ruling. This is how I will possibly think of him most as a man who always seemed very happy and to be enjoying his participation in JAM. His maturity, knowledge and vocal agility is still very much missed.

Who is he:
Derek was a successful comedy performer on stage and television over 47 years. He first won acclaim as a stage performer in the 60s with a six year run at London's West End in the musical Charley's Girl. He was a regular sitcom perfomer on TV in the late 60s and 70s usually in clerical garb on shows like All Gas And Gaiters and Oh Brother. He also had his own chat show for a time - Just A Nimmo.
Arguably his series of shows of a clerical nature hampered his career, as he became too associated with roles of that type, and his last 20 years saw him slip from the top ranks of performers. Still, not lacking in intelligence or courage, he reinvented himself as a successful businessman, taking plays around the world, and writing books on wine and theatrical stories. He also did a lot of after dinner speaking. Derek at times felt uncomfortable wit the new comedy of the 90s and once described "alternative comedy" as meaning an alternative to laughing, but he remained a much loved performer and was never short of work. He fell down stairs at his home in December 1998, and never fully recovered, dying the following March. His last job was an appearance on JAM.

Links to transcripts:
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 100 101 102 103 104 105 106 107 108 109 110 111 112 113 114 115 116 117 118 119 120 121 122 123 124 125 126 127 128 129 130 131 132 133 134 135 136 137 138 139 140 141 142 143 144 145 146 147 148 149 150 151 152 153 154 155 156 157 158 159 160 161 162 163 164 165 166 167 168 169 170 171 172 173 174 175 176 177 178 179 180 181 182 183 184 185 186 187 188 189 190 191 192 193 194 195 196 197 198 199 200 201 202 203 204 205 206 207 208 209 210 211 212 213 214 215 216 217 218 219 220 221 222 223 224 225 226 227 228 229 230 231 232 233 234 235 236 237 238 239 240 241 242 243 244 245 246 247 248 249 250 251 252 253 254 255 256 257 258 259 260 261 262 263 264 265 266 267 268 269 270 271 272 273 274 275 276 277 278 279 280 281 282 283 284 285 286 287 288 289 290 291 292 293 294 295 296 297 298 299 300 301 302

Ross Noble

JAM Appearances:
39 including 37 as a panellist on Radio in 2000-2001-2002-2003-2004-2005-2006-2008-2010-2011-2012, one as a guest subject setter on the 35th anniversary special on Radio in 2003, and one in the 40th anniversary special in 2007.
How he did:
Ross is almost a "regular" these days appearing frequently, and arguably has a big part to play in JAM's future. He has a style which is reminiscent of Paul's love of surrealistic fantasy but he is very much his own man. His style is to invent fantastic word pictures which are supremely funny, but he is just as good at the repartee as anyone else, although he is basically a gentler comedian than say Paul or Graham. Ross's style fits so well at JAM while being unique enough to him. He has a big future on JAM.
Who is he:
Ross's career is largely confined to his stand-up comedy appearances but why not when he has been so hugely successful at it. His Edinburgh Festival appearances this year were more popular than any other act - despite also charging the highest price-tag. Apart from the occasional appearance on Have I Got News For You, and a series of radio comedy travelogues Ross Noble Goes Global, Ross seems happy to concentrate on a hugely successful stand-up career. Recently judged one of the 50 funniest people in Britain. Ross now lives in Australia and his occasional visits to Britain usually include a JAM appearance.
Links to transcripts:
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37


Graham Norton

JAM Appearances:
104 including 98 as a panellist on Radio in 1996-1997-1998-1999-2000-2001-2002-2003-2004-2005-2006-2007-2008-2009-2010-2011-2012-2013-2014-2015-2016, five as a panellist on Television in 1994-1995-2012, and one in the 40th anniversary special in 2007.
How he did:
Graham is one of the most popular players on the show currently, having taken over the title of camp regular from Kenneth Williams, but with his own unique style. That style is full of double entrendre or even just single entendre - by any standard he is very rude. He has a good line in anecdote, with vocal gymnastics which are similar to Kenneth. Like the great one he can stretch a few words out to fill 10 seconds if need be. As he plays the game more often, Graham gets better at the game, and while he doesn't win as often as Paul or Clement, he is almost always competitive these days, though he also has the ability to put himself down.
He first played the game at unbroadcast performances at the Edinburgh Festival, and was so successful he moved into the TV and radio versions.
Graham's TV popularity has undoubtedly brought more fans to JAM. With his TV show going out five nights a week, he does JAM less frequently than he did a couple of years ago, but he is still up there with Paul Merton as the two biggest names on the show. A show with Graham on it is guaranteed to be a hoot!

Who is he:
Graham Norton is a big name in the UK. His first big gig was a weekly chat show called So Graham Norton and that eventually became a nightly show called V Graham Norton. Both shows combined celebrity guests, who Graham sent up mercilessly, with camp humour and outrageous comedy based around sex toys, sex websites and phonelines, and the sex exploits of the people in his audience. The taste barrier is just about removed with Graham in the chair. He now hosts a just slightly more restrained show on the BBC, The Graham Norton Show. He also took his show to the US, there it was called The Graham Norton Effect.
Before going into television, Graham was an actor and stand-up comic. As an actor he was best known for a bit part in the comedy series Father Ted. His stand-up act was a huge success and he eventually hosted his own sex-based game show Carnal Knowledge.
Graham's success with his own show has made him one of the highest paid people in British comedy. He has won several Baftas for his TV work and recently signed a deal to produce shows in the US with the Comedy Channel.In 2003 he was voted one of the 50 funniest people in Britain. These days he hosts several singing and dancing "reality" contests including the Eurovision.

Links to transcripts:
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87

Dara O'Briain

JAM Appearances:
Five as a panellist on Radio in 2003-2004-2005-2007.
How he did:
Dara seemed genial enough but was a bit overshadowed by the big mouths of Clement and Paul. Still an Irish brogue is always welcome on the show.
Who is he:
Dara is a very busy Irish comedian with a great funny stand-up act. He also does panel game appearances in between travelling with the stand-up act. In 2005 he took over the chair of the TV panel game Mock The Week.
Links to transcripts:
1 2 3 4 5

Tom O'Connor

JAM Appearances:
Two as a panellist on Television in 1999.
How he did:
Tom was keen and always trying to get in, even if the challenge was a fairly small word being repeated. He had a lot of good jokes to tell and was bubbly and good fun.
Who is he:
Tom was a big name in television in the late 70s and early 80s but his career has been on the slide for a while. He was involved in a series of variety and game shows including The Tom O'Connor Show and Name That Tune. He continues to be in demand on the after dinner speaking circuit and frequently appears on Countdown.
Links to transcripts:
1 2

Oliver ?

JAM Appearances:
One as a panellist on Junior Just A Minute in 2015.
Who is he:
A junior contestant in the second series of Junior Just A Minute.
Links to transcripts:
His show not yet transcribed.



Addison-Beaumont    Beresford-Bryson    Buckman-Daly    David-Clement Freud    Emma Freud-Hawks    Hayridge-Jupitus    Jupp-MacAulay    Macdonald-Melly    O'Neill-Richard    Robbins-Slattery    Small-Tyrell    Unwin-Wood



Just A Minute transcripts
My Just A Minute home page