JAM:PMerton,GNorton,JEclair,JLawrence
WELCOME TO JUST A MINUTE!

starring PAUL MERTON, GRAHAM NORTON, JENNY ECLAIR and JOSIE LAWRENCE, chaired by NICHOLAS PARSONS (Radio, 23 May 2011)


NICHOLAS PARSONS: Welcome to Just A Minute!

THEME MUSIC

NP: Thank you, thank you. Hello, my name is Nicholas Parsons. And as the Minute Waltz fades away once more, it is my huge pleasure to welcome our many listeners around the world. And also to welcome to the show four exciting, talented, clever individuals who play this game quite frequently. And they are, seated on my right, Paul Merton and Jenny Eclair. And seated on my left, Graham Norton and Josie Lawrence. Please welcome all four of them! And as usual I am going to ask them to speak on a subject that I will give them, and they will try and do that without hesitation, repetition or deviation. Sitting beside me is Sarah Sharpe, she is going to help me with the score, she will blow the whistle when the 60 seconds have elapsed. And we are going to begin the show this week with Paul Merton. Paul, oh what an interesting subject, if I were a super-hero. Tell us something about that subject in this game starting now.

PAUL MERTON: If I werea super-hero, I suppose the power I would like to have above all others would be invisibility. To be invisible would be strawt of a...

BUZZ

NP: Josie you challenged.

JOSIE LAWRENCE: Ah hesitation.

NP: Ah hesitation, repetition of be and all those other things.

JL: He's still a very nice man though.

NP: I know, I know, but we can't have that sort of charity in this show.

JL: We can't.

NP: And um, and so Josie you had a correct challenge, you get a point for that of course, and you take over the subject, and there are 49 seconds available, if I were a super-hero starting now.

JL: If I were a super-hero, I would like to have the power to go Zhom! And just stop things and then go in and change them around into something else that would please me more. I will give you an example. I was watching the telly with my friend Sandi and I told her about this power I would like to have. She didn't realise I was sitting next to the remote...

BUZZ

NP: Jenny challenged.

JENNY ECLAIR: Ah she did say power twice.

NP: Yes that's right, you did.

JL: Oh!

JE: I'm so sorry Josie, because it was a lovely story and I was really looking forward to hearing...

JL: Was power not in the title?

JE: No, it was just if I were a super-hero.

NP: If I were a super-hero.

JE: Yes.

JL: It's true, you're quite right Jenny. Carry on!

JE: Well done me!

NP: So Jenny you have a correct challenge, you have a point and you take over the subject and there are 29 seconds available, if I were a super-hero starting now.

JE: If I were a super-hero, I wouldn't wear a cape. What a nonsense article of clothing, getting trapped in car doors and lifts, suchlike. I would don a sensible pair of running shoes as super-heroes often have to go hither and thither very quickly indeed. My power would be discretion which is odd for a woman. People would tell me their secrets and I wouldn't let on. Mmmm I wonder how long that would last...

WHISTLE

NP: So Jenny speaking as the whistle went. And in this game, just to remind you, whoever is talking as the whistle goes gets an extra point. So Jenny you are in the lead at the end of that round. And we'd like you to begin the next round, as I think it's been chosen for you. Swimming in the sea, will you tell us something about that in this game starting now.

JE: I do like to swim in the sea. The other day I plunged off Cambersands. Some people... oh!

BUZZ

NP: Josie challenged.

JL: Hesitation.

NP: That was a hesitation yes.

JE: I was about to talk about my swim suit, and just the thought of it upset me! Good job we didn't go there!

NP: No.

JL: You've got a lovely little...

NP: So there are 54 seconds still available, Josie, swimming in the sea starting now.

JL: There's a wonderful island in the Maldives called Biyaadhoo. I am such a wonderful swimmer and...

BUZZ

NP: Graham challenged.

GRAHAM NORTON: It's just showing off! Maldives!

JE: At least I went to Cambersands!

GN: Cambersands!

JE: Yes!

GN: That's more like it!

JE: I like it! I'm down with the people!

GN: I know she's known all over the world, but seriously!

JL: It's a glamorous lifestyle I lead.

GN: I say deviation.

JL: What do you mean? No!

GN: From humanity

JL: Oh shut up! You're just jealous!

NP: No we loved hearing from you Graham, but so, I'm sorry, she wasn't deviating. So she has another point, she has 48 seconds, swimming in the sea, Josie starting now.

JL: You can cut a little coral hole...

BUZZ

NP: Graham challenged.

GN: Repetition of little.

NP: Yes you did say it was a lovely little island there. So Graham correct challenge, and you have a point of course, you have 46 seconds still available, swimming in the sea starting now.

GN: There's a lot of fuss about pollution these days. But I remember as a child, when you came home from the beach, you were covered in great big oil slicks...

BUZZ

NP: Josie challenged.

JL: Sorry, he did say a sa-slicks. Or was that me being pernickety?

GN: That's Irish for oil slick.

NP: I think it's a bit pernickety.

JL: Oh sorry.

GN: It's an old slick.

JL: Carry on.

NP: Yes, no, we all knew what he meant. Right so you have incorrect challenge Graham, another point to you, 35 seconds available, swimming in the sea starting now.

GN: Swimming in the sea is a nice idea. But unless you're the sort of crazy and rich individual who can swan off to the Maldives, the rest of us are trapped here in Britain where it's quite grim, and I've noticed, always very cold. If God wanted us to swim in the sea, surely he'd have made it a little bit warmer? Fish are ugly, who wants to join them to play? Cattle, they're attractive, go walking in a field. This could be deviation, but I've got to keep going...

BUZZ

NP: Paul you challenged.

PM: Deviation. he started talking about walking in the field as opposed to swimming in the sea.

NP: Right, well done Paul, you've come in there, with six seconds to go...

GROANS FROM THE AUDIENCE

NP: That is the game! Six seconds Paul, swimming in the sea starting now.

PM: The first time I swam in the sea was at Clapton. I was about five years old. My mother looked at me, she said swim towards...

WHISTLE

NP: So Paul Merton was speaking then as the whistle went, and gained that extra point. They're all equal now, no, Josie is one point ahead of the other three. And Josie we'd like you to begin the next round, oh, the best thing about going to the hairdresser. Sixty seconds starting now.

JL: The best thing about going to the hairdresser is the whole caboodle. I love the experience. My hairdressers are quite close to me, so it's only walking distance. When I get in there, they say "hey Josie, how are the cats?" No, actually they don't say that, they say "hey Josie, how's that..."

BUZZ

NP: You can't repeat what people say.

JL: No I can't.

NP: No no, Paul, you got in first.

JL: I was telling the truth.

PM: Yes the truth is sometimes repetitious. Hey Josie was repeated.

JL: Yes.

NP: Right, the best thing about going to the hairdressers is with you Paul...

BUZZ

JE: Paul doesn't go to the hairdressers. He's there...

PM: I don't get my hair cut in Disneyland! That's for sure!

NP: How do you know he hasn't spent ages at the hairdressers trying to get that particular look?

PM: What? This look?

NP: Yes.

PM: Have you? Have I?

NP: Yes, have you?

JE: Why...

NP: I was suggesting that you might have done.

PM: No.

NP: No, right okay. Paul you've got in with a correct challenge, you have the best thing about going to the hairdresser, 44 seconds starting now.

PM: The best thing about going to the hairdresser, particularly ladies' hairdressers in the 1960s was the overwhelming smell of peroxide that used to come through the door. And immediately I didn't know what it was. I used to say to my mother "what is that curious aroma that emanates from those huge things they put on your head?" And she told me what it was but she also...

BUZZ

NP: Jenny challenged.

JE: She and she.

NP: Yes there was a lot of shes there.

JE: Sorry I was being horribly pernickety and I do apologise. I will only do that once! Oh look, he's winning already, Paul!

NP: No, actually you're winning Jenny.

JE: Ah haahahaha!

NP: And you've now gone further in the lead with another point and 26 seconds on the best thing about going to the hairdresser starting now.

JE: I love going to the hairdressers because when I get my hair bleached...

BUZZ

NP: Paul challenged.

PM: Repetition of I.

NP: Paul that was a correct challenge.

PM: It was. A very boring one, but correct anyway.

NP: It underlies the fact that if you get pernickety, you're going to get retaliated. So Paul you've got the subject back, 23 seconds, the best thing about going to the hairdresser starting now.

PM: The best thing about going to the hairdresser for me is to find somebody who doesn't talk to me. I hate that child about have you been anywhere for your holiday? Isn't it nice for this time of year? Or who do you think is going to marry the Prince...

BUZZ

NP: Jenny challenged.

JE: Deviation, it is nice for this time of year. He said it is nice for this time of year and no, I'm sorry, I'll give up.

NP: So an incorrect challenge again Jenny and Paul you have another point, the best thing about going to the hairdresser and 12 seconds starting now.

PM: The best thing about going to the hairdressers undoubtedly is the free access to public radio. It's turned on, the wireless in the corner and you find yourself hearing all courts of news, all sorts...

BUZZ

NP: Jenny challenged.

JE: All courts of news.

NP: Yes, deviation from...

JE: Deviation from normal language.

NP: Or English as we understand it.

PM: Absolutely.

NP: And Jenny you've got in with one second to go.

SHOUTS OF "OOOOOHHHH" FROM THE AUDIENCE

NP: You've got another point but you haven't got many friends in the audience!

JE: I don't need them!

NP: Right and you have one second on the best thing about going to the hairdresser starting now.

JE: Bleaching my hair...

WHISTLE

NP: So Jenny speaking as the whistle went, and gained that extra point. She's now equal with Paul Merton in the lead, the other two are just behind them. And Graham Norton, we'd like you to begin the next round, the subject, pocket money. Tell us something about that in this game starting now.

GN: Pocket money is very important for young children because it teaches them a very valuable life lesson. That is, most people are richer than them! they can't buy very much with their pocket money because it's about, well, I as a child got about 50P, I expect it's about twice...

BUZZ

NP: Josie challenged.

JL: He said was about twice.

NP: Yes he did.

JL: Repetition.

GN: Yes yes I did, it was terrible. I feel awful.

NP: So Josie you have the subject, you have 42 seconds, pocket money starting now.

JL: When I was little, my father was hard of hearing. So when I got...

BUZZ

NP: Graham challenged.

GN: What?

NP: I think she was trying to say hard of hearing.

GN: Oh I see, thank you.

JL: I did, I burped slightly as I said hearing.

NP: I know, I think we understood what you were trying to say so maybe...

JE: Anyway he was Cockney so he was 'ard of 'earing, wasn't he.

JL: Yes.

NP: He came from the Midlands, didn't he.

GN: I'm a foreigner, I'm foreign.

NP: No, it was a sharp one so benefit of the doubt...

JL: Bless you!

NP: And so it is against Graham, I'll try and redress the balance later by giving a benefit of the doubt to Graham if I can. But 35 seconds with you Josie on pocket money starting now.

JL: So when I asked him if I could have some pocket money, he gave me a sculpture of a very tiny French impressionist to keep in my pocket. This was Monet of course. My mother then gave me threepence. Can you remember those old coins? I ran down to the tuck shop and decided to buy myself a lucky bag of sweets. I used to love sucking on a spaceship, that's not a euphemism. A spaceship is a piece...

BUZZ

NP: Paul challenged.

PM: Repetition of spaceship.

NP: Yes, 12 seconds is now available Paul for you to tell us something about pocket money starting now.

PM: I remember when I was first given pocket money around about the age of 11 years old. I think it equated to about five shillings a week...

BUZZ

NP: Josie challenged.

JL: Sorry, there were two abouts there.

NP: Oh darling! There were two abouts, weren't there?

PM: Mmmmmm.

NP: So Josie you have it. We usually let abouts and ohs and ums and that go. Five seconds, pocket money starting now.

JL: Blue ribbon was my favourite chocolate bar. It cost twopence but I loved it so much that I would...

WHISTLE

NP: So Josie Lawrence speaking as the whistle went, gained that extra point. And with others in the round she has now taken the lead ahead of Paul Merton, Jenny Eclair and Graham Norton in that sequence. And Paul we are back with you to begin. The subject now is the perfect excuse. Can you tell us something about that subject in this game starting now.

PM: The perfect excuse has to be tied in with some period of history. "I'm sorry I'm late, I travelled here on the Titanic" would be a perfect excuse if the year was 1912 and you were trying to explain your absence to your employer, why you had been maybe three weeks attending late work when you shouldn't have been. That didn't make any sense but it doesn't matter. And the other...

BUZZ

NP: Graham challenged.

GN: It matters! I felt it didn't make any sense, it was a deviation from...

NP: Deviation yes, you got him on his deviation which he admitted before you challenged. But 44 seconds for you Graham, the perfect excuse starting now.

GN: The perfect excuse if your doorbell goes and you're not sure who is there is to put on your coat and then open said gap in your wall, and if it's a welcome visitor, you say "I just got in". If you don't like the person, you reveal that you're just leaving...

BUZZ

NP: Jenny challenged.

JE: Person and person.

NP: There were two persons then.

GN: Whatever!

NP: Jenny you have 28 seconds on the perfect excuse starting now.

JE: If you are a woman the perfect excuse for your male boss is "I am very sorry, I have to visit the gynaecologist". He will not ask any further questions! Another great excuse for doing absolutely nothing is the purchase of an Ipad. Ever since I've had one of those gadgets, me has done nothing...

BUZZ

JE: Gaga!

NP: Josie you challenged.

JL: Me thinks she made a mistake.

NP: Me too yes.

JL: Yeah.

NP: Grammatically it was deviation.

JL: Grammatically yes.

JE: I went horribly remedial and I'm glad you stopped me, thank you.

JL: It was cute though.

JE: No it wasn't cute, it was horrible.

NP: No it wasn't horrible, it was entertaining. And you've got in Josie with four seconds to go on the perfect excuse starting now.

JL: The pefect excuse is only excusable if people believe you...

WHISTLE

NP: So Josie Lawrence was again speaking as the whistle went and increased her lead at the end of the round. Jenny we'd like you to begin the next round, the subject is doodles. I don't know whether you are a doodler or not, but talk on the subject, 60 seconds starting now.

JE: I am a doodler. Even playing Just A Minute, I have a pen, paper, doodling away. Sometimes squares...

BUZZ

NP: Paul challenged.

PM: Deviation, the paper's completely blank, there's not a single doodle on it.

JE: That is a doodle, ladies and gentlemen. It is a tiny doodle but it is a doodle!

NP: I think it'd be better if you showed the chairman. I can hardly see it.

JE: It is a minute doodle.

NP: No I wouldn't interpret that as a doodle. I don't know. Nah, no, it's too late now.

JE: What about that thing...

NP: It's too late now, darling. You did make out that you were doodling and you didn't, and Paul has drawn our attention to the fact. I know this is radio and you can't see what's going on but it is, I have to be fair within the, with the obvious visual rules that must apply. And Paul you have 53 seconds on doodles starting now.

PM: It's amazing the people that aren't locked up in psychiatric institutions, isn't it? When you think of all the various individuals walking around London. I often doodle in front of myself, a little piece of paper here, in a drawing. I see somebody in the front row and I just do their eyes and their hair and then the brow...

BUZZ

NP: Jenny challenged.

JE: Three theirs.

NP: Well they were rather close together.

PM: Yes.

NP: Thirty-seven seconds Jenny on doodles starting now.

JE: If you're a famous artist, you can get away without paying for your dinner by doodling on the serviette. Unfortunately this doesn't work for stand-up comics. Scribbling a joke on a napkin will not cut the mustard at a certain...

BUZZ

NP: Josie challenged.

JL: Hesitation.

NP: Yes I would interpret that as hesitation Josie. So you now have the subject and you have 21 seconds, doodles starting now.

JL: Doodles are supposed to be a kind of rumination of your inner psyche. I doodle a lot when I am on the phone to people, if I have a pen, and it's usually a doodle of a snail or a flower. What does this mean, I hear you ask, Graham. Well I shall tell you...

BUZZ

NP: Graham challenged.

GN: I said nothing! And also while we are, while we're talking, is a flower, that's a picture of, that's a drawing, not a doodle.

JL: That's what I do.

GN: I want to see! That's a flower, that's a picture of a flower.

NP: I've never know so much visual work in a radio show before. Graham I said if I had a chance to give you benefit of the doubt. As it was against Josie last time, you have it this time, you have a correct challenge and you have only two seconds to go on doodles starting now.

GN: Bailey is my labradoodle. Do you see what I've done there...

WHISTLE

NP: Well it's an extremely close contest this week if you are interested in that. But the points are that Josie is still in the lead, just ahead of Paul Merton and Jenny Eclair, equal in second place and then Graham Norton one point behind. And Josie we'd like you to begin the next round. Oh a nice subject for you, Florence Nightingale. Tell us something about that great woman in this game starting now.

JL: I played Florence Nightingale in a school play once so I know a tad about her. Florence's birthplace was indeed Florence, and funnily enough her sister Frances was born in Italy. Now from a very very... oh...

BUZZ

NP: Paul challenged.

PM: Very very.

NP: Very very yes, we can't let those go.

JL: It's true.

NP: And so Paul you've got the subject of Florence Nightingale and you have 43 seconds starting now.

PM: She had this protruberance on her face, she was known as the Lady with the Lump! And in the Crimea War she would go around. She would say to the soldiers "how are you feeling today? You're looking a little bit under the weather." And she would administer her balm soothing calmness. And her nursing skills would give her great renown and fame throughout her entire life. And when she retired, people were so grateful that she actually looked at the corps of nursing and seen how...

BUZZ

NP: Josie challenged.

JL: Nursing was twice.

NP: You talked about nursing, yes right.

JL: Sorry Paul.

NP: Don't apologise, a correct challenge darling. Sixteen seconds Josie, back with you, Florence Nightingale starting now.

JL: During the Crimean War she was indeed known as the woman with the lantern. She used this on her rounds because if not, it would be too dark and she would trip over people, I guess. When she got back from the war, she set up a wonderful establishment to help...

WHISTLE

NP: So Josie Lawrence was again speaking as the whistle went, gained that extra point, has increased her lead. And Graham we are with you to begin, and the subject is how to scare a small child. They do think up some weird subjects, don't they? Graham, off you go, 60 seconds starting now.

GN: When it comes to children, it is important to remember that they're just like people, only smaller. So if you want to scare one, say three or four years old, just let them watch a video of The Exorcist or The Texas Chainsaw Massacre, that's quite hard to say. And they will be terrified out of their wits. I imagine you'll hear them screaming all the way down the street! (laughs)The social worker...

BUZZ

NP: Paul challenged.

PM: Well it was a repetition of uh-huh.

GN: That's a medical condition, Paul!

PM: That is a medical condition? If it's a medical condition, I withdraw my challenge. Is it a medical condition?

NP: No no it isn't. Because in this Just A Minute, it was a vocal sound. Huh-huh, you know.

PM: You've got it as well? It is a medical condition!

GN: His Graham Norton impressions are getting marvellous!

PM: Yeah.

GN: Huh-huh! It's uncanny! It's like looking into a mirror! And I own that jacket!

NP: Anyway Paul, correct challenge, you have 37 seconds, how to scare a small child starting now.

PM: Auntie Jenny's coming to see you!

BUZZ

NP: Graham you challenged.

GN: I'll go with hesitation.

NP: Do you know, I don't know how you spotted that.

GN: Thank you! I have played the game before, Nicholas, actually! Yeah yeah.

NP: So yes a definite hesitation and 30 seconds are available, how to scare a small child Graham starting now.

GN: You could go up to children and say "now I don't want to upset you but your parents are trying to sell you". That would often make them cry. How we laughed, they ran away going "Mommy, Daddy, are you trying to sell me..."

BUZZ

GN: Oh I'd said that already.

NP: Jenny challenged.

JE: Double sell.

NP: Yeah double sell, right. So Jenny you got in on this subject, how to scare a small child, 17 seconds starting now.

JE: I once bumped into an old boyfriend who was with his small child, and said to that kiddy I could have been your mother!" Should have seen brat's face. Oh it fell to pieces, screaming down the street. the other thing you can do is say "I am the..."

WHISTLE

NP: So Jenny Eclair was then speaking as the whistle went, gained the extra point. And she's moved forward, she's equal with Paul Merton in second place. They're a point or two behind Josie Lawrence who is still in the lead, and Graham Norton is bringing up the rear magnificently.

JE: (laughs) Too easy!

GN: He's still doing his Graham Norton impression!

NP: Whatever you do is magnificent Graham. Paul we'd like you to begin the next round, the subject is the biggest cheapskate I know. Sixty seconds starting now.

PM: The biggest cheapskate I know isn't here tonight. But sometimes that individual does play Just A Minute. I won't identify them as either a man or a woman but let me give you one example of how cheap this individual can be. well actually I can't because if I give you some clues, you will be able to work out the exact, it's a bit like one of those super injunctions. I shall give you the initials, perhaps that way you won't be able to. If I initialise the individual, you might not be able to...

BUZZ

NP: Jenny challenged.

JE: A couple of individuals.

NP: Yes, two, more than one individual there. So Jenny you cleverly got in with, not cleverly but... I'm sorry, I don't mean it that way. You were clever to be the first to get in.

JE: Yeah.

NP: But you...

JE: Thank you Nicholas.

NP: Thirty-four seconds, the biggest cheapskate I know starting now.

JE: I think it might be my mother, who is the only woman I know to have cut up her own wedding dress to make a lampshade. She has also had the same piece of tinfoil for 35 years. Another contender is my sister who doesn't believe in central heating or tumble driers. Consequently her towels remove your skin as they are all horrid and scratchy. I can't bear cheapskates. There's nothing worse than being out with a bloke who will not open his wallet for you, How rude is that!

WHISTLE

NP: So Jenny Eclair cleverly kept going until the whistle went and gained that extra point. And I've just been told we are going into the final round. And Jenny it is your turn to begin and the subject is, which you require in this game don't you, quick thinking. Sixty seconds starting now.

JE: Unfortunately I am not a quick thinker, which is a disappointment... oh sorry, I didn't mean that.

BUZZ

JE: Disadvantage! Yes.

NP: It doesn't matter. Josie you challenged.

JL: Well she said disappointment but I knew she meant to say disadvantage.

NP: She hesitated, didn't she.

JL: Yeah.

NP: Well done Josie, right...

JL: I love him!

NP: Fifty-five seconds on quick thinking with you Josie starting now.

JL: If somebody says to me in a panic, "quick, think of something", I immediately think of a monkey singing that old music...

BUZZ

NP: Paul challenged.

PM: Well it's a bit harsh, but it is a repetition of think.

NP: Yes you see, thinking is on the card, which you can repeat as often as you like.

JL: I know, it's all right.

NP: Forty-seven seconds Paul on quick thinking starting now.

PM: Formula One drivers have to have very quick thinking as their car approaches the bends of those tracks you see around the world. They are very dedicated...

BUZZ

NP: Josie challenged.

JL: There's two verys.

NP: Yes they are very, well done, well listened Josie, 38 seconds, quick thinking starting now.

JL: You have to have a lot of quick thinking, especially on panel shows. Because if you don't think quickly, then this kind of thing happens.

BUZZ

NP: Paul challenged again.

PM: Oh it's repetition of think.

NP: Think you said. Thinking's on the card, you keep saying think.

JL: But I timed it. Don't you see?

NP: Yes you timed it beautifully and got a nice laugh.

JL: Thank you.

NP: But unfortunately it was incorrect. So Paul's got in again with 31 seconds on quick thinking starting now.

PM: One way to ward off Alzheimer's apparently is to do crossword puzzles. Stephen Fry swears by the Sunday Times version. I myself like to have a go at the Guardian quick one on the back page of the D2 part of that newspaper. A good way to make sure that you are quick thinking is to test your various verbal skills against other members of the entertainment profession on a popular radio show such as this called Just A Minute which is being broadcast here on Radio Four...

BUZZ

NP: Graham challenged.

GN: Repetition of radio.

NP: Yes, radio programme, Radio Four.

PM: Oh yes. Yeah.

NP: So well listened Graham. And you've cleverly got in with two seconds to go on quick thinking starting now.

GN: Quick thinking is terribly important...

WHISTLE

NP: So Graham Norton was then speaking as the whistle went, gained that extra point. And he's finished up only just in fourth place. No, he's in third place actually because there is a second equal. It's Paul Merton and Jenny Eclair are equal in second place. Out in the lead, a few points ahead of them all was Josie Lawrence so we say Josie, you are the winner this week!

JE: Well done Josie! Well done!

NP: So it only remains for me to say thank you to these four fine challenging players of the game, Paul Merton, Jenny Eclair, Josie Lawrence, Graham Norton. We thank Sarah Sharpe who has helped me with the score, blown her whistle so delicately when the 60 seconds elapsed. We are grateful to our producer Claire Jones. We are indebted to Ian Messiter who created this amazing game. And we are grateful to this lovely audience here in the Radio Theatre who have cheered us on our way. So from our audience, from me, Nicholas Parsons, and the panel, good-bye, thank you for tuning in. Be with us the next time we play Just A Minute! Yes!

THEME MUSIC